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Published on April 8th, 2015 | by Noel Thorne

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The Legacy Of Luther Strode #1 Review

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Four years ago Justin Jordan and Tradd Moore exploded onto the comics scene with The Strange Talent of Luther Strode, a hyper-violent action yarn that broke both creators into the industry.

Since then Jordan has worked on titles for DC, Boom, Valiant, and Image, and recently secured a TV deal for his Boom comic, Deep State. Moore drew the fantastic first arc of Marvel’s All-New Ghost Rider as well as a second Luther Strode book with Jordan.

We’ve come full circle now with The Legacy of Luther Strode, the third and final arc in the trilogy, as Jordan and Moore, along with colourist Felipe Sobreiro, re-team one last time to close out the title that started it all for them. And WHAT a beginning to the end!

This is a bumper-sized first issue clocking in at 40 pages, which fans are going to love especially as this book was expected last year. But, quality comics take time to produce and Legacy #1 is certainly worth the wait.

We start in Biblical times as the story of Samson and Delilah is retold. Samson slays an entire army with a jawbone, beautifully and very graphically rendered by Moore, and every bit as violent as you’d expect from a Luther Strode comic. Then Samson is betrayed by Delilah – ominous foreshadowing perhaps for Luther and Petra’s relationship?

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If you’ve been reading Jordan’s other Image title, Spread, chances are you’ve read this next sequence already as The Bridge previewed at the end of Spread #6. Whether or not you’ve read it already though, it’s a blisteringly exciting set piece as we’re introduced to Luther and Petra again who escape from the cops.

Without going into every part of this issue, I’ll just say that the storyline is Luther being challenged by the villains once and for all and he accepts – insane action ensues! Jordan’s writing is tight, fast-flowing, and perfectly in sync with Moore’s art, knowing when to step back and let the artist tell the story. It’s a fine script and one of his best I’ve read in some time.

But Moore’s art is really the star of the show here. If you’ve never heard of Tradd Moore, check out his work IMMEDIATELY! He’s an artist you have to keep an eye open for. He’s only been around for a few years but he’s already up there as among the most exciting and talented artists working today – and he’s only getting better!

Whether he’s working at Marvel or Image, Moore’s art always stands out as visually distinct and instantly memorable. With The Legacy of Luther Strode, we have Moore’s best work to date, which is saying something.

The Samson and Delilah sequence looks a lot like the art on the sides of ancient urns, particularly the battle scene when Samson destroys the army with a jawbone, albeit much more detailed. He also frequently uses the same figure within a large panel to show the fast-moving action to great effect and the action is very fluid.

Two panels stand out: Luther running up the side of a falling truck, and a car chase that takes in Lombard Street. The panels are richly textured with gorgeously vivid colours from Sobreiro.

There are also pop culture references intended to place Luther in the same field as these characters. During the fight scenes Luther looks a lot like a super saiyan Son Goku, and the chase sequence is very similar to the one in The Matrix Reloaded. Son Goku, Neo, Luther Strode.

Whether you’re a returning fan or completely new, The Legacy of Luther Strode #1 is an excellent read for fans of violent action superhero comics. It looks like this final arc is going to be one helluva farewell – jump on board for one last blood-soaked ride!

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Publisher: Image

Writer: Justin Jordan

Artist: Tradd Moore

Colourist: Felipe Sobreiro

Noel Thorne

Probably reading comics as you're reading this.

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