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Published on May 20th, 2015 | by JCDoyle

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Shutter #12 Review

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As the first Act of Shutter comes to a close, Kate Kristopher wants some answers but she isn’t going to like them.

Joe Keatinge has woven a tale of craziness throughout Shutter, introducing a range of outlandish characters all of which help root Kate firmly to the ground. She is and has been the only one who has made any sense in the mad cap world and in this issue she gets to question the very nature of reality. With her sister Kalliyan, Kate enters the belly of the beast that is Prospero, a secret organisation that it turns out is currently under the rule of Kate’s long lost mother.

After all of the trials and tribulations Kate has been through she finally reaches the end of her tether, and to be honest I’m surprised it took this long. She explodes into accusations and demands the truth from her mother but she doesn’t care about family issues, she just wants to know what Prospero is all about.

The Secrets of Prospero

In short, the greatest and most advanced of each generation since the emergence of Man have been initiated into Prospero. Together they have manipulated the world, forcing evolution upon everything so that mankind would continue to exist. Without Prospero Mankind would have died out a long time ago. Prospero are the ultimate power in the world.

And Kate has been brought up to be a part of the red robed society.

But here’s the kicker, she doesn’t want anything to do with it. She enjoyed her life before the craziness took over her life; she had a job, a life and friends that meant everything to her and now she has lost it all. She has looked upon her family and found them wanting. All she desires is to return to the normal life that she had in the beginning.

This does not go down very well with her red robed mother…

Shutter #12 insert 2

Over the last 12 issues Keatinge has taken Kate, and the reader, on a long, insane ride that all leads to here, to the final issue of this first arc. Although a number of plot threads are still left hanging (what has happened to the young Chris and the Alarm Clock Cat?) so much of the events depicted in the last year or so come into some kind of focus. The truth behind Prospero explains not only Kate and her family but so much of the world Keatinge has introduced the readers to. Like the Shakespearean namesake, Prospero has control over the world and what happens within that world just as Keatinge is in control of this comic and what happens in this comic. Each issue has included some reference to the art of storytelling and in this finale the villain of the piece has become, in some metaphorical way, the narrator of the work, or even Keatinge himself.

Shutter #12 insert 1

 

It has been extremely clever and also very entertaining. The script by Keatinge and the art by Leil Del Duca have been of a high quality throughout most of the run so far and, for the most part, the comic has kept me riveted month after month.  It has been a difficult comic to jump into if you missed the first few issues but rewarding for those that have read the full run.

What does the future hold for Kate and her mad-as-a-bag-of-badgers family? Who knows. Kate has been left in a difficult position but with a determination to ‘Kick some ass’. And the epilogue opens up a whole new playing field. Whatever comes after the hiatus (back in August for the start of Act 2) I have confidence that Keatinge will keep it as fresh and interesting as the first act has been.

Shutter12_Cover

Title: Shutter

Publisher: Image Comics

Writer: Joe Keatinge

Artist: Leila Del Duca

Colours: Owen Gieni

Letterer: John Workman

JCDoyle

JCDoyle

Lover of comics and Art and Sci-Fi in multiple media. Currently teaching my kids the ways of the Geek (while protecting my first editions)
JCDoyle

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